SPACE PLANNING

SPACE PLANNING

DECO WOOD DECORATION LLC to consider 13 Points when deciding how to layout your room, home,  office and villa

  • Think about the structure of the room, what are the main focal points? These could be windows, fireplaces, doors or built in units.
  • Perception of space is based on body size. Different size spaces suit different size people: one person’s claustrophobic box is another’s cosy nest.
  • Think about the space in terms of volume, eg: if it were a fish bowl, if you add in a sofa, chandelier, sculptures, bookshelves, table, coffee table etc, you displace some of the water. Ensure that you don’t overfill the space.
  • Aim to create both a prospect and a refuge in each room so you can feel enclosed, but also have a view beyond to the outside or natural world. Using Prospect and Refuge theory in a space can make it more comfortable for the human experience. “We prefer a shelter (refuge) with a view (prospect), because humans have their field of vision to the front (prospect), therefore needing some sort of protection from behind (refuge).”
  • Plan your furniture with a scale drawing of your room or cut paper shapes to size and place them in the room to work out the best possible arrangement of furniture and accessories.
  • Ensure that the circulation passageway through a room follows an easy and economic pathway from the door to all the other main activity areas.
  • Clutter closes down space, so edit your clutter to avoid blocking both circulation and reducing the perceived size of a room.
  • In large or long spaces, subdivide different activity zones to give definition to each part of the room.
  • When planning decoration and lighting, work with the principles that vertical lines draw our eyes up and horizontal lines draw them across to extend or reduce the proportions of a room.
  • Wallpaper with a square grid or tiling a room in squares will give the impression that it is bigger than it is – the smaller the grid, the larger the room appears.
  • Borrow space from outside by ensuring an uninterrupted view of the outside world. You can also ‘borrow’ space from adjoining rooms by using the same flooring materials.
  • When furnishing small rooms, blur the edges of the room to break up the lines between floor and walls; draw furniture a little way away from the walls; buy furniture in proportion to the room.
  • Disguise oversized sofas by breaking up their upholstered surface with a different coloured or textured runner or folded throw.

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